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Fudge Lab Members

Douglas Fudge

Dr. Fudge runs the Comparative Biomaterials Lab at Chapman University. As an undergraduate, he studied biology at Cornell University, followed by an M.A.T. in science education, also at Cornell. For his M.Sc. research, he worked on the biology of bluefin tuna at the University of Guelph, and then moved to the University of British Columbia for his Ph.D., where he worked on the biomechanics of hagfish slime in John Gosline’s lab. As an NSERC postdoctoral fellow, he worked on cell biomechanics in Wayne Vogl’s lab in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. He joined the faculty in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph in 2005, where he worked until 2016.

Dr. Yu Zeng

I’m a biologist who integrates biomechanics with organismal biology to address fundamental questions in ecology and evolution of novel mechanisms. My current NSF-founded research addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in thread skein production within gland thread cells of hagfishes. 
 
Website: yuzeng.org

Andrew Lowe

Andrew is the Animal Care Technician for the Fudge Lab currently making sure the fishes are healthy and assisting in the various projects of the lab. Andrew received his BS in Molecular Environmental Biology from UC Berkeley in 2013 before working as an elephant care keeper at the Oakland Zoo and then as an environmental consultant. He received his Master’s degree from CSU Fullerton in 2019 where he studied the armor of an armored catfish Corydoras trilineatus, and the bite force of red-bellied piranhas, Pygocentrus nattereri.

Matthew Snyder

Noah Bressman

Dr. Noah Bressman is a biologist that primarily focuses on fish functional morphology, biomechanics, and animal behavior. He received his BA from Cornell University in 2016 where he studied the terrestrial behaviors and orientation of the mummichog, an intertidal killifish. Noah received his PhD from Wake Forest University in 2020 where he studied amphibious fishes, mostly focusing on why certain invasive fishes go onto land, how they move around while on land, and where they go while on land. Currently, Noah is studying the properties and potential applications of hagfish slime and its effects on predatory fish.

Keolani Kahale-Lua

The project that I am working on focuses on understanding the behavioral patterns and structural mechanisms that allow for specific burrowing techniques in Atlantic hagfish, a relatively unexplored area within the animal’s vast range of intricate locomotive abilities. 

Luke Arnold

I am currently studying the mechanisms of hagfish locomotion by observing their navigation techniques within increasingly complicated and narrowed pathways.

Kristen Nieders

The project I am working on focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce thread skein within the thread gland cells.  

Dahlya Habashi

I am currently studying light sensitivity in hagfishes.

Zach Baker

I’m analyzing underwater video of hagfishes and other species from a recent research expedition to the Galapagos Islands.

Luke Taylor

I’m working on the biophysics of clogging in hagfish slime.

Lucy Chalekian

I’m working on understanding the biophysical mechanisms of how hagfish slime deploys in seawater.

Alumni of the Fudge Lab

Dr. Gaurav Jain

Dr. Gaurav Jain

Timothy Winegard

Timothy Winegard

Dr. Sarah Schorno

Dr. Sarah Schorno

Ramteen Rafii

Ramteen Rafii

Emma Whiteley

Emma Whiteley

Sara Siwiecki

Sara Siwiecki

Skylar Petrichko

Skylar Petrichko

Lindsay Zumwalt

Lindsay Zumwalt

Charlene McCord

Charlene McCord

Kashika Singh

Kashika Singh

Marie Starksen

Marie Starksen

Aly Dwight

Aly Dwight

Stacey Zuppa

Stacey Zuppa

Dylan Blumberg

Dylan Blumberg

Lauren Friend

Lauren Friend

Justin Nako

Justin Nako